The new SharePoint Framework has a safety net when you develop and style your components. Whenever you write a new style sheet class this will be picked up by a SASS preprocessor that first compiles the SASS file and then applies a special random string to the class name.
This should theoretically avoid that two web parts have conflicting style sheet classes. If one web part uses the style sheet class ‘item’ and another web part uses the same class name. The last web part embedded on the page will win the battle how the item should look like. Through this renaming you make sure that every web part has an individual definition of the item. In general this is a good behavior.
On the other hand, you have frameworks or Office UI Fabric where those classes won’t be renamed.
There are also some negative impacts caused by that method and there is also an easy way to disable this renaming of style sheet classes. If you do so, then you need to be aware of certain things on how to make your styles available exclusively just for your web part.

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The SharePoint framework improved a lot during the last drops. I thought to myself what fancy sample can I build using the framework. During the Hackathon at the European SharePoint Conference we saw a lot of great uses of this new framework. One team was even able to add a framework web part to SharePoint 2007.
Actually, last weekend I came up with an idea. It was more a proof of concept I would like to try. I asked myself the question. Will I be able to drag and drop data between two individual web parts.
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