The new SharePoint Framework has a smart way to avoid conflicting CSS definitions. Therefore all style sheet classes will be post-fixed with a unique random string and converted to a JSON object. In your web part code, you can use the same class name as you used in your style sheets and the variable will be automatically replaced with the random class name string. So far the good parts of the SharePoint Framework.

In practice, this has some limitations and challenges.

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The new SharePoint Framework has a safety net when you develop and style your components. Whenever you write a new style sheet class this will be picked up by a SASS preprocessor that first compiles the SASS file and then applies a special random string to the class name.
This should theoretically avoid that two web parts have conflicting style sheet classes. If one web part uses the style sheet class ‘item’ and another web part uses the same class name. The last web part embedded on the page will win the battle how the item should look like. Through this renaming you make sure that every web part has an individual definition of the item. In general this is a good behavior.
On the other hand, you have frameworks or Office UI Fabric where those classes won’t be renamed.
There are also some negative impacts caused by that method and there is also an easy way to disable this renaming of style sheet classes. If you do so, then you need to be aware of certain things on how to make your styles available exclusively just for your web part.

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What is inside the SharePoint CSS

Ever wondered what is defined in the corev15.css? Let’s take a little look to some statistics of this style sheet. Another thing I like to consider how you change the style sheets when additional frameworks such as bootstrap will be applied to SharePoint. Plus, we will take a look how SharePoint Style Sheets will be changed when an branding will be added based on Bootstrap.

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Over the last year I did more branding projects on Office 365 than on on-premise. Since the first call by Microsoft to avoid modifications of the master page I played around with certain scenarios and patterns to reduce or avoid such modifications.
One common issue is that the suite bar is responsive (everything that resize is responsive) but not well optimized for mobile. Without any enhancements this part of SharePoint shows only half of the content. With some small CSS only modifications the suite bar looks great on nearly any device.
The following blog post use SASS pre-processed CSS the compiled CSS can be found too at the end of this post.

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During the last years I’ve intensively used web fonts. Since I published the first blog post on how you use web fonts in SharePoint 2010.
While I just downloaded the web fonts and used the CSS that was included in the font packages I recognized more and more that most of the available web fonts are wrong defined inside the font packages. There are a couple of problems with the definitions of the @fontface that you can avoid creating a cleaner style sheet.

Roboto font

Roboto font

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