On the 11.11.2017 the first SharePoint Saturday will happen at the Microsoft Headquarters in Vienna. I’m pretty excited to announce that the registration is now open.
To see the lineup and program, you will find a complete listing of the sessions on our home page.

To keep up-to-date you can follow our twitter account (@spsvie) or join our Facebook Page.

Join our first SharePoint Saturday in Vienna and I hope to see you in November!

 

In Office 365 there is a great mechanism that allows you to implement a corporate wide branding on the suite bar. The customer can apply their logo and their corporate colors there.
On Monday I thought to myself what if I can make the suite bar less distracting than it is. The solid black and blue combination draw a lot of attention on every load while browsing the various portals and applications.
I customized my suite bar in the admin center to have a white background with the logo in the center of the page. All content pages in Office 365 so the white background, I thought, will seamlessly integrate the ribbon on the page instead of standing out.

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I believe one on the most used front end tools in the web development world is out there is Moustache or Handlebars. It is easy to use; you can write native HTML and compelling too.
In the SharePoint world, many web parts directly show data on the page, and therefore this is the right weapon of choice to get fast going.
Right after the first version of SPFx become public available, I created a ticket in GitHub on how to use this front end tool. With the RC0 drop of the framework, a new functionality has become available that allows you to embed Handlebars through a so-called webpack loader. I was pretty excited when Pat Miller tweeted me about this.

Let me show and explain what steps are required to make use of it in your next project.

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Yes, you read correctly. The modern team sites got image renditions or at least predefined image formats that will be used by the responsive experience of modern team sites.
Back in the past image renditions was exclusively available in publishing sites only. Well, you were able to use them in team sites too, but the publishing features had to be enabled at site collection level. In addition, classic image renditions might cause negative performance impacts. This was first spotted and documented by Chris O´Brien.
I guess this new feature doesn’t have much to do with the traditional image rendition and you are able to use it in your web part code too. For example, if you like to write a custom image gallery or develop a classic display template.
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On July 29 Microsoft announced that they will completely remove of code-base sandboxed solution support in Office 365.
The main problem is that many of those SharePoint solutions just deploy XML based artifacts but no binary code.
Nevertheless I think many of those sandbox solutions deploy an empty dll to Office 365 especially when they are developed in Visual Studio.
This unwanted dll can be simply avoided directly through the correct configuration of your Visual Studio.

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Not so fast… As announced at the May the 4th event there are a lot of new technologies that come to SharePoint and you can pick your personal flavored framework to enhance the SharePoint.
Some things of the upcoming changes are already available in Office 365. Things like the hidden web parts or the new document library. Time to rip the components of the new document library apart and show you what was used to build it.

TL;DR

The new document libraries are built with the following three core components:

  • React
  • KnockoutJS
  • RequireJS

In addition a React-based implementation of Office UI Fabric will become available together with the new SharePoint Framework.

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While I was looking at the new SharePoint site content page I asked myself if more can be found that gives an indication of the upcoming framework and future improvements.
First, I took a look at the source code. Not a big surprise the page was built again using Facebooks ‘React‘ for the user interface and ‘Knockout‘ was used for data binding.
After that I came up with the idea to take a closer look at the web part gallery to see if might some web parts have been deployed to. To my big surprise I found overall five new web parts.

Web Parts of the new SharePoint Framework Extension

Web Parts of the new SharePoint Framework Extension

While some web parts are used to provide tips and trick or how to get started. Two other web parts are more interesting.
The ‘Embed Video Web Part’ and the ‘Embed picture library web part’. I populated them to the gallery and added them to a page in SharePoint. Currently they are deployed, but sadly not working yet. There are no web part specific properties to be configure now and I guess they current won’t load any additional Script or CSS.

New webparts embedded on page

New webparts embedded on page

Embed video web part makes sense to me because this is currently handled by a script embedding web part. A web part that is not responsive without customization.
The embed picture library web part is more interesting because the description states that you can use this to create a fancy new slide show.
In addition to those upcoming web parts it is likely that the new namespace of the additional framework will be ‘Microsoft.SharePoint.SPX‘.

Finally

It is great to see at least a glimpse of the upcoming changes and how the new user interface will be built. Waiting until autumn is still such a long way to go. Especially if you use the same mechanism to customize SharePoint for at least two years now.
Let’s hope it will be released sooner than later. I guess many people love to get their hands on it and provide feedback. Even if it is not rock solid yet.
If you are not so familiar with things like Yeoman, Angular, ReactJS, Handlebars or Knockout, please check out some really great web casts done by the Office PNP team.