Yes, you read correctly. The modern team sites got image renditions or at least predefined image formats that will be used by the responsive experience of modern team sites.
Back in the past image renditions was exclusively available in publishing sites only. Well, you were able to use them in team sites too, but the publishing features had to be enabled at site collection level. In addition, classic image renditions might cause negative performance impacts. This was first spotted and documented by Chris O┬┤Brien.
I guess this new feature doesn’t have much to do with the traditional image rendition and you are able to use it in your web part code too. For example, if you like to write a custom image gallery or develop a classic display template.
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The new SharePoint Framework has a safety net when you develop and style your components. Whenever you write a new style sheet class this will be picked up by a SASS preprocessor that first compiles the SASS file and then applies a special random string to the class name.
This should theoretically avoid that two web parts have conflicting style sheet classes. If one web part uses the style sheet class ‘item’ and another web part uses the same class name. The last web part embedded on the page will win the battle how the item should look like. Through this renaming you make sure that every web part has an individual definition of the item. In general this is a good behavior.
On the other hand, you have frameworks or Office UI Fabric where those classes won’t be renamed.
There are also some negative impacts caused by that method and there is also an easy way to disable this renaming of style sheet classes. If you do so, then you need to be aware of certain things on how to make your styles available exclusively just for your web part.

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On July 29 Microsoft announced that they will completely remove of code-base sandboxed solution support in Office 365.
The main problem is that many of those SharePoint solutions just deploy XML based artifacts but no binary code.
Nevertheless I think many of those sandbox solutions deploy an empty dll to Office 365 especially when they are developed in Visual Studio.
This unwanted dll can be simply avoided directly through the correct configuration of your Visual Studio.

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Not so fast… As announced at the May the 4th event there are a lot of new technologies that come to SharePoint and you can pick your personal flavored framework to enhance the SharePoint.
Some things of the upcoming changes are already available in Office 365. Things like the hidden web parts or the new document library. Time to rip the components of the new document library apart and show you what was used to build it.

TL;DR

The new document libraries are built with the following three core components:

  • React
  • KnockoutJS
  • RequireJS

In addition a React-based implementation of Office UI Fabric will become available together with the new SharePoint Framework.

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In the final part of this series I like to take a look on scenarios, how to use Office UI Fabric efficiently. As mentioned in part two using pure Office UI Fabric might can be a bit difficult sometimes.
Especially when you don’t like to copy and paste the code from the snippet gallery all the time. Personally, I think it is a bit difficult even if you are experienced in using frameworks. There are many things that need to be learned in addition. A thing such as Suit CSS naming conventions, correct class names, components, text sizes, class names of colors, complete HTML structures.

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